Elementary Evidence of Children’s Challenging Choices

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April 17, 2021 – Images from my Saturday stroll by the elementary school in my neighborhood on this lovely spring morning.

10 thoughts on “Elementary Evidence of Children’s Challenging Choices

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  1. An entire generation of children brainwashed to live in fear of a virus that isn’t even a serious risk to them. Tragic. Criminal. I look forward to a Nuremberg Trials 2.0 to bring the criminals who did this to justice.

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    1. Thank you for sharing your thoughts, Art. Poverty from unemployment, isolation, and virtual learning have all taken a toll on the lives of children and families. The US is an incredibly divided nation when it comes to COVID, fear of differences on so many levels, and an absence of social justice, So many children die from homicide, suicide, and police violence, and more die or fail to reach their potential because of oppression, discrimination, and mean-spirited social welfare policies. And ironically, those who claim to support the right to life for the unborn have no problem denying millions of children access to decent housing, nutrition, health care, education, safe water to drink and clean air to breathe. I couldn’t walk past the images drawn by children of those who have died without sharing both their innocence and their suffering

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  2. The situation is reflected here in the UK too. Politicians have made many mistakes which will resonate for decades. Children may not become ill but they can give the virus to adults who will. These are strange times we live in and I don’t think a comparison can be made. We must remain kind and maintain love and hope for a better future for our children, a future without this devastating virus. We can take the decision makers to task, later.

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    1. I am sorry to hear the UK is facing similar challenges for youth, Helen. After a year of virtual learning, my granddaughter was afraid to go back to school when they started meeting face-to-face again. After one class, she chose virtual learning again. There’s nothing “normal” about teens who are isolated from peer social interactions during their formative years. It’s hard to see a way through this COVID challenge given the extreme divisiveness here in the US.

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    1. I agree, Dave, It is heartbreaking to see that children have had to deal with so many losses already at such young ages. I wonder how many adults were able to see their drawings before the rain came today to wash them away?

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    1. It is heartbreaking to see, Pam. I decided to share the images with students in the research class I teach during last week’s Zoom class meeting, along with the photo I took just before class. We always begin class by sharing what we noticed that morning. During my morning walk before class that day, I noticed that the previous images had been washed away by rain and new images were in their place – ghostly drawings of many bodies in different positions lined the sidewalk. There were no signs of play or beauty as a counter-balance. As a class, we discussed how to use research as a way to explore what was going on in an objective respectful way that didn’t shame, pathologize, or censor, but opened up opportunities for dialogue to find out what students were feeling and dealing with and what could be done to help if need be. Today, I noticed the sidewalks had no drawings at all. I may never know why…

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