Fog – September 26, 2020

Today I arose early, 5 o’clock in the morning, to work on my presentation for class today. Because we always begin class by sharing something we noticed in the morning, I decided to peer out the upstairs window just in case I saw something interesting. I did. The earth was shrouded in silence and mystery, enveloped in thick fog. Of course, I didn’t have my camera, and I had no intentions of writing anything. Yet as I greeted the morning from my side porch after making a cup of coffee, the words that flowed through me demanded to be written before I could focus on finishing my Power Point about research methodologies.

 

Fog

Gazing out my window this morning
at the world surrounding my house
enshrouded in stillness and fog
before anyone else has awakened
I sense the divide between heart and mind
dissolving and blurring as well

*
*

Fog – it feels like a metaphor
for these times when it’s hard to see
anything clearly beyond
this one place on the earth
and beyond this moment only

The blessed silence – a welcomed respite
from the daily news of tragic loss,
suffering, and cruelty
that encircle the globe

Yet, there are also inspiring examples
of courage and everyday kindnesses
that touch my heart ever deeper

19 thoughts on “Fog – September 26, 2020

Add yours

  1. … tragic loss,
    suffering, and cruelty
    that encircle the globe

    Yet, there are also inspiring examples
    of courage and everyday kindnesses
    that touch my heart ever deeper

    I suppose it is a truism that as the first is more obvious and pronounced, the second stands out all the more. Then it’s a question of choosing which “side” one is on and would rather stay on.
    I also like your use of the fog as a metaphor for a moment of fragile peace.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments, Sha’Tara. It’s true, I would prefer to only live in a world of kindness, but that isn’t possible while so many suffer. Your insights reminded me of Parker Palmer’s words about standing in the “tragic gap.”

      “By the tragic gap I mean the gap between the hard realities around us and what we know is possible — not because we wish it were so, but because we’ve seen it with our own eyes.” (Parker J. Palmer, 2013, Courage & Renewal, http://www.couragerenewal.org/723/).

      Moments “of fragile peace,” a lovely way to describe fog as a metaphor, provide a way to live in both worlds despite an often aching heart.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wonderful poem of thoughts swilling in fog bringing a brighter perspective to a world that is crazily in search of light.

    Because of your words Tubularsock put on his positive coat but by then the fog had cleared …….. back to the salt mines.

    Thanks for your light. We do need it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Quote: ““By the tragic gap I mean the gap between the hard realities around us and what we know is possible — not because we wish it were so, but because we’ve seen it with our own eyes.” (Parker J. Palmer)

    A good way to describe it. Some call it “walking between the worlds” and the Teachers explained the way to do it was to remain both, joyful and sorrowful, at the same time (and of course, always) This combats the fear and the natural selfishness of the need for survival. We are too far along our humanity to rely on mere survival instincts any longer. Yes, we need to stand firmly in that tragic gap, however painful it can be at times, and we need to understand why we choose such a place. I call it compassion.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful poem……”divide between heart and mind dissolving and blurring”….a fog makes us uncertain of what is before our eyes….it leaves scope for imagination, indeed blurs out the divide between a dream and reality.

    Liked by 1 person

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